a b f g h l n o p r s v w

Badges

Cattle, horses, sheep, goats, hogs, poultry, and other domesticated animals are important to people for many reasons. They supply us with food and clothing, we use them for recreational purposes, they work with and for us.
Tracking in hunting and ecology is the science and art of observing animal tracks and other signs, with the goal of gaining an understanding of the landscape and the animal being tracked (quarry).
The chemistry of living organisms
From the mattock and hoe to the horse and mule, the cotton gin and reaper, the tractor and air seeder—this is the story of farm equipment. Today, most farms are mechanized and farmers can do most of their own maintenance work and make the adjustments needed on their many intricate farm implements.
Wildlife management is the science and art of managing the wildlife—both animals and fish—with which we share our planet. Maintaining the proper balance and the dynamics that go with it requires humankind's attention. We use this stewardship tool to help minimize or eradicate the possibility of extinction of any given species. We want our descendants to have the opportunity to experience the same animal diversity that we now enjoy.
In working through the Forestry merit badge requirements, Scouts will explore the remarkable complexity of a forest and identify many species of trees and plants and the roles they play in a forest's life cycle. They will also discover some of the resources forests provide to humans and come to understand that people have a very large part to play in sustaining the health of forests.
Humans have been growing plants for thousands of years. Farmers and horticulturists make their living growing food and other plants, while other people grow gardens for pleasure. Becoming a good gardener requires a Scout to understand the science of growing plants—how to prepare the soil, how to select and plant seeds, and how to care for the growing plants.
In addition to learning how to safely ride and care for horses, Scouts who earn this merit badge will gain an understanding of the instincts and behaviors of horses and humane and effective methods for training horses.
Scouts who complete the requirements to earn the Leatherwork merit badge will explore leather's history and its endless uses. They will learn to make a useful leather item using the same types of raw materials that our ancestors used; be challenged to master skills like hand-stitching, lacing, and braiding.; and learn how to preserve and protect leather items so they will last a lifetime and beyond.
The impacts of environmental pollution are often difficult to see. A major oil spill, however, provides dramatic evidence of potential harm to wildlife. Oil spills along coasts affect many parts of the environment, both nonliving such as water, ocean bottom, and shoreline and living such as sea birds, marine mammals, and shellfish

Our investigation into a sustainable organic gardening process will require the generation of compost. Thermal composting will produce more compost in less time.



Learn how to create compost with worms, also known as vermicomposting.




Peterson Briquette press is used to make briquettes from biomass very easily.

Plant scientists use their curiosity and knowledge to develop questions about the world of plants. Then they try to answer those questions with further observations and experiments in the laboratory and in the field. To earn this merit badge, Scouts will explore three of the most important plant science specialties: agronomy, horticulture, and field botany.
Here's an astonishing number to digest. Each person in the United States uses about 700 pounds of paper each year. Paper is everywhere in our lives. Every year in the United States, more than 2 billion individual books, 24 billion newspapers, and 350 million magazines are published on paper.
Boys always have been interested in snakes, turtles, lizards, and alligators, as well as frogs and salamanders. Developing knowledge about these captivating creatures leads to an appreciation for all native wildlife; understanding the life cycle of a reptile or amphibian and keeping one as a pet can be a good introduction to natural history, and knowing about venomous species can help Scouts to be prepared to help in case of an emergency.
Conservation isn't just the responsibility of soil and plant scientists, hydrologists, wildlife managers, landowners, and the forest or mine owner alone. It is the duty of every person to learn more about the natural resources on which our lives depend so that we can help make sure that these resources are used intelligently and cared for properly.

Soil is a living and life-giving natural resource. As world population and food production demands increase so will the demands on our soil

The field of veterinary medicine in the 21st century is one of the most exciting medical professions in which to work. The skills of a veterinarian are practiced with cutting-edge technology and treatment options, and the profession offers a wide range of career choices.
Opportunities in the welding field are endless, and Scouts earning their welding merit badge can not only explore the fundamentals of welding but also learn about the different career paths within the industry.